Front Range Christian School is fully accredited through the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI), so you can expect that your 9th-12th grade student will be prepared for college and beyond through vigorous academics, deep spiritual formation, and an authentic and engaging high school experience.

Please note that some of these courses are offered on a rotation basis. Please contact the principal or guidance counselor if you have questions about a particular course.

FRCS School Crest

Bible

Course Plan

To meet current graduation requirements, students MUST take 1.0 credits of Bible for every year that they are at FRCS.

  • 9th grade
    • Life of Christ
  • 10th grade
    • New Testament Epistles
  • 11th grade
    • Junior Seminar
    • Becoming Like Christ (0.5 elective credit; year-long)
  • 12th grade
    • Senior Seminar
    • Becoming Like Christ (0.5 elective credit; year-long)

Department Overview

Department Overview

The Bible department at Front Range Christian School exists to cultivate students who, through the careful reading of God’s Word, come to know themselves in light of the Truth, live virtuously, engage culture redemptively, and dialogue confidently and compassionately.

The Pillars of the Bible Department

1. Read God’s Word Carefully

“Scripture has never, in any major part of the Christian church, been simply a book to be referred to when certain questions are to be discussed. From the very beginning it has been given a key place in the church’s worshipping life, indicating that it has been understood not only as part of the church’s thinking but also as part of the church’s prayer and praise.” -N.T. Wright, Scripture and the Authority of God

The Bible Department strives to create a culture in which the reading of God’s Word is built upon both scholarly research and spiritual discipline.  We seek to teach students how to study the geographical, historical, literary, and cultural context of Scripture, but we find lacking any reading of God’s Word that merely stops at this point.  Instead, we also strive to teach students to intentionally place their lives under the authority of Scripture.  We aim to produce students who read the text exegetically and are able to identify and refute isegesis whenever present.  We aim to produce students who meditate and reflect on the Word of God with reverence, realizing its proper place of authority over all aspects of our lives.

2. Know Themselves in Light of the Truth

“One must first learn to know himself before knowing anything else.  Not until a man has inwardly understood himself and then sees the course he is to take does life gain peace and meaning.” – Søren Kierkegaard, Journals and Papers

The Bible Department strives to create a culture in which students are allowed the space and freedom to discover their identity, calling, gifts, and purpose.  The Bible Department teaches from the conviction that any attempt to discover the self must be made in relation to God and His Word.  The process through which one learns to know oneself is essentially meditative and reflective, and the Bible Department relies heavily on the use of questions to help guide students in this process.  We seek to produce students who consistently remain immersed in God’s Word to inform the way that they think about themselves.

3. Live Virtuously

“Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point.” – C.S. Lewis

The Bible Department seeks to create a culture in which virtues are identified and practiced.  We seek to come alongside the students in order to help them identify the virtues that the Bible teaches, not merely the virtues which the student values or the behaviors that come most naturally to them.  In addition to the identification of virtue, the Bible Department is committed to creating opportunities and experiences in which students may practice virtue.  These opportunities and experiences are only valuable if they are then reflected upon in light of what the Bible says about virtue.  The Bible Department teaches from the conviction that holding students accountable as they fail to practice virtue is one of our highest responsibilities as Christian educators and perhaps the realm in which we have the greatest opportunity to equip and train students to impact the world for Christ.

4. Engage Culture Redemptively

“Silence in the face of evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act.” – Dietrich Bonhoeffer

The Bible Department seeks to create a culture in which students learn to be compassionately uncompromising with the truth.  We hope to develop students who are willing to die to themselves in order to follow the gospel.  We hope to develop students who care about those that society marginalizes, excludes, and neglects.  We hope to develop students who do not merely consume or critique culture but rather students who create culture.  In pursuing these goals, we aim to create students who are trained and equipped to impact the world for Christ.

5. Dialogue Confidently and Compassionately

“As we strive to follow our Lord, we will often agree on what faithfulness looks like. But when disagreements and controversies arise, as they inevitably will, we hope that we will have learned to approach them as an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the truth and to grow in love for our Creator and for one another.” – Kevin Taylor, Controversy as Opportunity

The Bible Department seeks to create a culture in which the biblical text is not merely informational but rather transformational.  We teach from the conviction that our role is not merely to transfer information but rather to create opportunities for the spiritual formation of each student.  No other pedagogy lends itself to this goal to the same extent as does dialogue.  Dialogue can be the medium through which the student reflects, the arena in which the student practices virtue, and the mirror in which the student learns of the self.  We hope to develop students who dialogue about the biblical text with nuanced understanding.  We hope to develop students who will adamantly test and prove every claim they hear against the claims of Scripture.  We hope to develop students who are more interested in pursuing truth than they are in being right.  We hope to develop students who engage in dialogue with the confidence necessary to speak for themselves, the fortitude required to listen with resilience, and the refusal to remain ignorant.

Life of Christ

  • Grade level: 9th
  • 1 year/1 credit

This course immerses students in the life of Jesus Christ as depicted in the four Gospels. The class will begin with an introduction to the geographic, political, and cultural situation of first century Palestine. Then, the majority of the course will be spent considering Christ’s birth, preparation for ministry, baptism, teaching, healing, disciple-making, crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension. The narrative in the Gospel of Luke will form the basic structure for the course, but there will be regular forays into the other Synoptic Gospels and the Gospel of John. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the person and work of Christ as depicted in all four Gospels and be able to articulate a thoughtful response to Jesus’ own question, “Who do you say that I am?” (Matthew 16:15)

New Testament Epistles

  • Grade level: 10th
  • Text: Bible
  • 1 year/1 credit

The New Testaments epistles contain instructions for godly living. These epistles were often written due to hardships or crises for developing Christian communities. This course surveys the epistles in light of their circumstances, background, context, and setting in order to equip students to better understand the instruction found in the New Testament epistles. Using the Book of Acts as a chronological template, students will learn about the early origins of the Christian church, the adverse conditions that it faced, and the political climate of the first century Greco-Roman world. The goal is that students will become proficient at interpreting biblical texts, capable of engaging in dialogue about the biblical text, and motivated to apply biblical guidance to modern life.

Junior Seminar

  • Grade level: 11th
  • 1 year/1 credit

This course is designed to challenge students to know what they believe and then to develop the capacity to defend and explain those beliefs to others. Students will investigate five core areas: veritology, philosophy/ethics, anthropology, theology, and science. Juniors will be required to complete projects during each unit as well as an end of the year project that will focus on writing and defending their theistic worldview. The goal is that the students will be well-equipped to engage the world and culture surrounding them from a biblical worldview and perspective.

Senior Seminar

  • Grade level: 12th
  • 1 year/1 credit

This is a discussion-based course that is designed to challenge students to explore the ways in which Christians can experience the fullness of life in the following areas: Relationships, Money, Church, Discipleship, and The Word. In order to robustly examine the Christian life in these areas, students will rely on contemporary and ancient authors, as well as examples from the lives of the saints who have gone before us. Students will also complete an involved and demanding Capstone Experience.

The goal is that students, through the careful reading of God’s word and the intentional practice of Christian virtue within these four areas, will come to know themselves more fully, be better equipped to engage culture redemptively, and be capable of dialoging confidently and compassionately about the fullness of life found in Christ.

Becoming Like Christ

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Texts: The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer; Devotional Classics, eds. Richard J. Foster and James Bryan Smith
  • 1 year/1 credit

This course is designed to challenge students in the true meaning of discipleshipthe long and narrow road to become more like Christ. Students will explore and experience discipleship through three main avenues. They will engage with the challenge and cost of discipleship by being discipled, discipling younger students, and encouraging one another in discipleship. Students will read and engage with the teaching of Christ, as well as with the teachings/writings of prominent Christians throughout history. In order for students to participate in this class, they must be selected and complete/undergo an extensive application/interview process. Students are able to participate in this course for two consecutive years. 

Foreign Language

Course Plan

  • 9th
    • Spanish 1
    • Spanish 2
    • Spanish 3
  • 10th
    • Spanish 2
    • Spanish 3
    • Honors Spanish IV
  • 11th
    • Spanish 3
    • Honors Spanish IV
  • 12th
    • Honors Spanish IV

Department Overview

Department Overview

Our Spanish program begins in 8th grade with Spanish 1. The courses 1, 2, 3, and Honors Spanish 4 build on each other and use continuous review of vocabulary and grammar concepts. The program is designed to give the students a comprehensive overview of the Spanish language. The program also gives students insight to Spanish-speaking cultures and people.

Spanish 1

  • Grade level: 8th, 9th
  • Text: ¡Exprésate!; Holt, Rinehart and Winston
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class

This course is designed to give students a good beginning in the Spanish Language. Level 1 introduces the four basic communicative skills, reading, and writing, speaking, and listening. In this year, students will communicate primarily using the present tense. Various cultures are also studied. There are no prerequisites to taking this course.

Spanish 2

  • Grade level: 8th, 9th, 10th
  • Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or Spanish 1 Plus
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class

Spanish 2 reviews the major points learned in Spanish 1. This course will enhance the student’s ability to use their skills in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural awareness. In this course, students will reinforce their abilities to communicate in the present tense, as well as begin to use past tenses. Various cultures are also studied.

Spanish 3

  • Grade level: 9th, 10th, 11th
  • Prerequisite: Spanish II
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class

Spanish III reviews the major points learned in Spanish 2. The course will enhance the students’ ability to use their skills in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural awareness. In this course, students will reinforce their abilities to communicate in the present and past tenses, as well as begin to use future, conditional tenses. Various cultures are also studied.

Honors Spanish 4

  • Grade level: 10th, 11th, 12th
  • Prerequisite: Spanish 3
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class

Spanish 4 reviews the major points learned in Spanish 3. The course will enhance the students’ ability to use their skills in speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural awareness. In this course, students will reinforce their abilities to communicate in the present, past, future, and conditional tenses, as well as begin to use formal and informal commands and the subjunctive mood. Various cultures are also studied.

Language Arts

Course Plan

  • 9th grade
    • Grammar and Composition
    • Honors Composition
  • 10th grade
    • World Literature
    • Honors World Literature
  • 11th grade
    • American Literature
    • AP Language and Composition (offered every other year)
    • AP Literature (offered every other year)
  • 12th grade
    • British Literature
    • AP Language and Composition (offered every other year)
    • AP Literature (offered every other year)

Department Overview

Department Overview

The 7-12 grade Language Arts program at Front Range Christian School seeks to enable students to evaluate literature from a Christian Worldview and to connect the values of the society to the literature it produces. Through the use of literature, writing and critical thinking skills, students are guided into an understanding that all literature must be filtered through God’s Word. All literature is examined for its Biblical value and truth. Critical thinking skills and expository writing skills are used to discern the effect that literary trends have upon revealing the values and beliefs of our society. All literary genres will be studied with specific emphasis placed on specific cultures as the students advance in their ability to discern.

Educational Philosophy

It is our conviction that students are able to discern literature as it is filtered through the word of God. Understanding literature of a culture as it relates to God’s truth will enable students to understand the values of that culture and the effects that those values have on its ability to follow God’s plan for righteousness.

Grammar and Composition

This course will give students practice in four major areas: the 6 Traits of Writing, grammar review, literary analysis, and college preparatory skills (goal setting, time management, study habits, test taking skills, and reading comprehension). Students will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate short stories, poetry, nonfiction essays, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and several other works. Students will discern biblical truths using critical thinking and writing skills. Students will develop strong study skills, research skills, as well as fine tune the mechanics of writing through well-developed five-paragraph essays, literary analysis essays, and a MLA-based research paper covering a topic outside of the English content area.

Honors Composition

This course will give students practice in the areas of writing and literary analysis. Students will learn how to improve their writing style through numerous five-paragraph essays, literary analysis essays, and a literary analysis research paper (MLA-based) over the novel To Kill A Mockingbird. Students will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate short stories, poetry, nonfiction essays, Romeo and Juliet, and other works. Students will discern biblical truths using critical thinking and writing skills. Grammar skills are reviewed and solidified with the goal of mastery.

World Literature

  • Grade level: 10th
  • Text: See the reading list
  • Prerequisite: Grammar and Composition
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class
  • See the Book List for this class

World literature is examined by looking at universal themes, such as but not limited to, Expanding Horizons, Choices & Consequences, Turning Points, Clashing Forces, Striving for Success, and Legacies, as seen in ancient societies through modern day cultures. The focus is on how these universal themes are found in each culture and traceable back to their biblical foundations. This course will afford students the practical tools to facilitate their success in high school and lay the foundation for their success in college. These tools are comprised of various techniques designed to improve students’ abilities in reading, writing, verbal communications, and analytical skills. This will take the form of lectures; class discussions and activities; personal journals; and relevant, oral presentations. Students will learn and use the Toulmin method of argumentation in their writing assignments. Students will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate short stories, poetry, nonfiction essays, and several literary works.

Honors World Literature

  • Grade level: 10th
  • Text: See reading list
  • Prerequisites: Grammar and Composition; Prior Approval Needed
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

World literature is examined by looking at universal themes, such as but not limited to, Expanding Horizons, Choices & Consequences, Turning Points, Clashing Forces, Striving for Success, and Legacies, as seen in ancient societies through modern day cultures. The focus is on how these universal themes are found in each culture and traceable back to their biblical foundations. This course will also afford students the practical tools to facilitate their success in high school and lay the foundation for their success in college. These tools are comprised of various techniques designed to improve students’ abilities in reading, writing, verbal communications, and analytical skills. This will take the form of lectures; class discussions and activities; personal journals; relevant, oral presentations; and engaging papers, essays, and a research paper. Students will learn and use the Toulmin method of argumentation in their writing assignments. Books that will be covered in this class are available on the reading list. This course is intended to prepare students for AP Literature.

American Literature

  • Grade level: 11th
  • Text: The American Experience, Prentice Hall; see the reading list
  • Prerequisites: Grammar and Composition; World Literature
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

This course will present a study of American literature from Native Americans to contemporary authors. This course will afford students the practical tools to facilitate their success in high school and lay the foundation for their success in college. These tools are comprised of various techniques designed to improve students’ abilities in reading, writing, verbal communications, and analytical skills. This will take the form of lectures; class discussions and activities; personal journals; and relevant, oral presentations. Student writing is based on mastering the 6 Traits of Writing. Students will learn how to improve their writing styles through numerous five-paragraph essays, literary analysis essays, and a MLA-based research paper. Students will read, interpret, analyze, and evaluate short stories, poetry, nonfiction essays, and various literary works. Students will discern biblical truths using critical thinking and writing skills.

British Literature

  • Grade level: 12th
  • Text: The British Experience; Prentice Hall; see the reading list
  • Prerequisites: Grammar and Composition; World Literature; American Literature
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

This course examines British literature as it relates to its history and culture. Emphasis is placed on the connection between the events of the day and literature produced as a result of those events. There will be frequent opportunities for writing both formally and informally with an emphasis on the six-trait writing process (ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency and conventions). Models of published writings will be used as examples of one or more of the six-traits. Frequent feedback from both teacher and peers for revision will provide opportunities for encouragement and development.

AP Language and Composition

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Various Texts Based on College Board Standards (see reading list)
  • Prerequisites: Grammar and Composition; World Literature and/or American Literature; Prior Approval Needed
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class
  • Fee: $90 exam fee plus cost of books

AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose, written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the style of language contribute to effectiveness of writing.

This course will emphasize the expository, analytical, and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication, as well as the personal and reflective writing that fosters the development of writing in any context. Students will read primary and secondary sources carefully, to synthesize material from these texts in their own compositions, and to cite sources using conventions recommended by professional organizations such as the Modern Language Association (MLA).

As a whole, this course will enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers.

As a culmination of this course, the student will take the AP English Language and Composition Exam given in May. A grade of 4 or 5 on this exam is considered equivalent to a 3.3 to 4.0 for comparable courses at the college or university level. A student who earns a grade of 3 or above on the exam may be granted college credit at most colleges and universities throughout the Unites States. Even if the student does not make a high score on the AP test, this class should be a benefit in and of itself.

Please note that this course is offered in rotation with AP Literature (only one of the two is offered each year).

AP Literature

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Various Texts Based on College Board Standards (see the reading list)
  • Prerequisites: Grammar and Composition; World Literature and/or American Literature; Prior Approval Needed
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class
  • Fee: $90 exam fee plus cost of books

The Advanced Placement Literature and composition class is designed to push students to achieve higher understanding and thinking skills as well as provide them the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university English literature/ humanities course. By selecting a variety of texts from a variety of time periods, the student will be able to identify and apply not only the components of literature but be able to critically view each piece in an educated light. Above and beyond preparing the students for college, it is the teacher’s desire to provide an environment where the student begins to love literature and learning.

As a culmination of this course, the student will take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam given in May. A grade of 4 or 5 on this exam is considered equivalent to a 3.3 to 4.0 for comparable courses at the college or university level. A student who earns a grade of 3 or above on the exam may be granted college credit at most colleges and universities throughout the Unites States. Even if the student does not make a high score on the AP test, this class should be a benefit in and of itself.

Please note that this course is offered in rotation with AP Language and Composition (only one of the two is offered each year).

Math

Course Plan

  • 9th grade
    • Algebra I
    • Geometry
  • 10th grade
    • Algebra II
    • Geometry
    • Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus
  • 11th grade
    • Algebra II
    • AP Calculus AB
    • College Algebra
    • Statistics
    • Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus
  • 12th grade
    • AP Calculus AB
    • College Algebra
    • Statistics
    • Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus

Department Overview

The core courses for curriculum are Algebra and Geometry I, Algebra and Geometry II, Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus I, and Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus II. Geometry, Honors Algebra and Geometry II, and Honors Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus are opportunities available for advanced math students. They may begin Algebra and Geometry I as early as 8th grade and then proceed through the core courses one year ahead of schedule. This allows them the opportunity to take AP Calculus AB in their senior year. Advanced classes are available on an interest only basis.

To meet current college track graduation requirements, students MUST complete Four (4) Credits in Math within their high schools years. High schools credit will not be given to 8th grade students who complete Algebra and Geometry 1 during their 8th grade year.

Algebra I

  • Grade level: 8th, 9th
  • Text: Glencoe Algebra I, McGraw-Hill Education
  • 1 year/1.0 Credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class
  • TI-83/84 graphing calculator required

In this course, students will build on the core algebraic building blocks that were presented in Pre-Algebra. This course utilizes multiple representations of problems, critical thinking problems, word problem practice, review of recent concepts, and hands-on exercises that help make the material applicable to the real world.

As a result of this course:

  • Students will understand rational numbers, and they will be able to perform the appropriate operations to be able to evaluate rational expressions, including rational expressions containing more than one variable.
  • Students will be able to effectively use proportions, ratios, and percents.
  • Students will be able to analyze, solve, and graph multi-step linear equations and inequalities.
  • Students will be able to solve and graph systems of equations using substitution and elimination.
  • Students will effectively be able to add, subtract, multiply, divide, and factor polynomials.
  • Students will be able to solve and graph quadratic equations.
  • Students will be able to simplify radical expressions and effectively work with right and similar triangles.
  • Students will be able to select and use appropriate statistical methods to analyze data and will understand the basic concepts of probability. They will be introduced to matrices.

Algebra II

  • Grade level: 10th, 11th
  • Text: Algebra II;  Glencoe McGraw-Hill
  • Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry
  • 1 year/1 credit
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class
  • TI-83 or TI-84 calculator required

This course follows Algebra I and Geometry. Algebraic concepts will be taken to a deeper understanding by studying functions, “families of functions,” equations, inequalities, polynomials, rational expressions, complex numbers, matrices, and sequences and series. Students will learn to communicate, both orally and written, the logic of algebraic procedures and interpretation of results they find. The graphing calculator will be used to assist in teaching and learning.

AP Calculus AB

  • Grade level: 11th or 12th
  • Text: Calculus, Saxon
  • Prerequisites: Trig/Pre-Calculus I
  • 1 year/1.0 Credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core class
  • TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator require
  • Fee: $90 exam fee plus cost of books

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry I. The course material is designed to introduce a student to the fundamental concepts of calculus while strengthening advanced mathematics principles. Upon successful completion of this course, a student will have acquired a proficiency in basic calculus concepts and will be prepared to successfully complete the Advanced Placement Calculus AB Exam. The course integrates multiple physics and engineering applications with the calculus content, thus providing the student a broad range of experience in both the pure mathematical as well as the applied mathematical aspects of the calculus content. The course utilizes an “incremental development” approach to present the lessons in order to provide a solid foundation that encourages mastery of all concepts. This class covers approximately 100 lessons over the course of the year and follows the material sequence as laid out in the text. Elements from the text that are not covered on the Advanced Placement Calculus BC Exam are eliminated or covered in brief detail. Homework usually consists of 15-20 problems per day with testing approximately twice a quarter.

Students who successfully complete any of FRCS’s AP classes may also receive dual credit from Colorado Christian University (CCU) at a cost of $200 for three credit hours (this is in addition to the $90 AP exam fee).

College Algebra

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Text: College Algebra, Pearson
  • Prerequisites: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II
  • 1 year/1.0 Credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Course
  • TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator required

This course follows Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. This course will help students gain a solid understanding of algebra in order to be prepared for future mathematics courses, show students how algebra models and solves real-world problems, and develop problem-solving skills in students through critical thinking. The textbook is written so students realize how algebra relates directly to their life outside of the classroom. Students will learn more about the fundamental applications of Algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomials and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants, conic sections, sequences, induction, and probability.

Geometry

  • Grade level: 9th, 10th
  • Text: Geometry, Glencoe McGraw Hill
  • Prerequisites: Algebra I
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class
  • Scientific calculator required

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed a minimum of Algebra I. Throughout the course, students will use both inductive and deductive reasoning to create proofs of theorems and postulates being learned. Geometry is intended to familiarize a student with spatial relationships in two dimensional shapes and in the end to three dimensional space. The course begins by introducing students to lines and angles, especially in reference to parallel and perpendicular lines. It then moves into the relationships of congruence, proportion, and similarity in triangles. The students will then take the relationships learned about triangles and extend them to quadrilaterals and circles, with special emphasis given to angles, arcs and segments intersecting a circle. Finally, students will take the information learned in two dimensional space and formulate theorems and postulates that are similar in three dimensional space.

CCP Statistics

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Text: Bluman, Elementary Statistics
  • Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Instructor permission
  • 1 Year/1.0 Credits
  • Approved by NCAA
  • CCP Class (dual credit offered through Colorado Christian University)

An introduction to probability, basic statistics and statistical analysis. Descriptive and inferential statistics and attendant research designs will be investigated. Students will become familiar with statistical formulas in spreadsheet applications, although this is not a course focused on computer generated statistics as much as it is on the underlying assumptions and concepts used in statistical analysis. This course is designed to teach the student how to properly collect, analyze and interpret data for the purposes of research.  Students will learn how to evaluate statistically based research studies and recognize bias when present in print or media. Topics include: Data Presentation and Summarization, Probability, Probability Distributions, Normal Distributions, Estimates and Sample Sizes, Testing Hypotheses, Tests Comparing Two Populations, Correlation and Regression.

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus

  • Grade level: 10th, 11th
  • Text: Glencoe Advanced Mathematical Concepts: Precalculus with Applications; McGraw-Hill
  • Prerequisites: Algebra II
  • 1 year/1 credit
  • Approved by NCAA
  • Core Class
  • TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator required

This course is designed to provide a foundational understanding of calculus concepts, such as linear relations, functions, equations, inequalities, and graphs as well as polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Polar coordinates, complex numbers, critical points, and limits are also explored. The course covers a unit in trigonometry and one in statistics. The student will become familiar with using a graphing calculator to aid with his/her problem solving skills. The course provides real-world application problems, graphing calculator explorations, review of past concepts, and SAT/ACT preparation problems.

Natural Sciences

Course Plan

  • 9th grade
    • Biology
    • Honors Biology
  • 10th grade
    • Earth Science
    • Chemistry
  • 11th grade
    • Anatomy & Physiology
    • Chemistry
    • CCP Chemistry
  • 12th grade
    • Physics
    • Anatomy & Physiology
    • AP Biology
    • CCP Chemistry

Department Overview

Science is a specific way of examining nature. From seventh grade to high school, our students learn scientific methodology through inquiry and problem solving, as well as application for practical purposes. A good background in science is essential for an increasing number of professions. It is also helpful for making intelligent choices in an increasingly technological society. The purpose of the Front Range Christian school science program is to provide the student with a foundational knowledge of the sciences, an appreciation of its many benefits to mankind, and a better understanding of the precision and design of the physical world that God has created.

To meet current college track graduation requirements, students MUST earn 4 Natural Science credits.

Anatomy & Physiology

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Text: Hole’s Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology – 9th Edition; Glencoe-McGraw Hill
  • 1 year/1 credit
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core class

This class involves an instructional analysis of human anatomy and physiology. It describes cellular organization, and then proceeds through tissues, organs, and organ systems. The lab exercises are integrated closely with the content of the Anatomy/Physiology lectures and are designed to review and illustrate various anatomical and physiological facts and principles presented in lecture and the textbook to help students investigate some of these ideas in more detail. This course is intended for students who may have an interest in pursuing a career in allied health fields.

AP Biology

  • Grade level: 12th
  • Text: Biology, AP Edition, 9th Edition, Campbell/Reece
  • 1 year/1.5 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class
  • Test and Lab Fee: $125

The Biology AP course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of both high school biology and chemistry. Biology AP includes those topics regularly covered in a college introductory biology course and differs significantly from the standards-based, high school biology course with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the kind of laboratory work performed by students, and the time and effort required of the students. The textbook used by Biology AP is also used by college biology majors and the kinds of labs done by AP students are equivalent to those done by college students. Biology AP is a course that aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. This course is designed to prepare students for the Biology College Board Advanced Placement Exam.

Students who successfully complete any of FRCS’s AP classes may also receive dual credit from Colorado Christian University (CCU) at a cost of $200 for three credit hours (this is in addition to the $90 AP exam fee).

Biology

  • Grade level: 9th
  • Text: Biology; McDougal/Littell
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Biology includes the study of all life forms and is subdivided into cell biology, genetics, classification and diversity of kingdoms, and human biology. This class is designed and taught using both theory/lecture and hands-on laboratory activities. Students will focus on developing a better understanding of the scientific method of problem solving as it relates to living things. Videos and other instructional media are also used to introduce and explore various biological concepts.

CCP Chemistry

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th
  • Text: Chemistry, Addison-Wesley
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Chemistry is equivalent to a college level general chemistry course that provides rigorous study in four major areas: structure of matter, states of matter, reaction and descriptive chemistry. Students must be highly motivated to tackle this rigorous course. At the end of the year, students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination for college credit. Students taking this course may be required to complete laboratory work outside of the regular class time. The student will demonstrate a basic understanding of, and the ability to apply, mathematical solutions to problems involving atomic theory and structures, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, kinetic theory, solutions, reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamics, and descriptive chemistry. Evaluation is based on homework, lab reports and tests. Much of the class is “out of class homework” and in class “lab” based work. Out of class time requirement: 6-8 hours per week.

Dual credit for this course is offered by Colorado Christian University (CCU) at a cost of $200 for three credit hours.

Chemistry

  • Grade level: 10th, 11th
  • Text: Chemistry; Addison-Wesley
  • Prerequisite: Geometry or Algebra 1
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Chemistry is designed to fit the needs of students who desire a basis in chemistry concepts and laboratory skills. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with a foundational knowledge of chemistry, an appreciation of its many benefits to mankind, and a better understanding of the precision and design of the physical world that God has created. It is designed for students that are interested in science, and may be taking chemistry, or other science courses in college. Laboratory activities are very much a part of this course, so students will often be designing and completing experiments, making observations, and analyzing data.

Earth Science

  • Grade level: 10th
  • Text: Earth Science; Glencoe
  • 1 year/1.0. credit
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Earth science is the study of earth and space. Topics will include the earth’s origin and history (the Genesis account of creation is stressed, but various theories of origin are also discussed), the materials that compose the earth, internal processes (earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics), air and water, environmental issues and astronomy. Throughout the study of earth science, students will apply the scientific method of problem solving, participate in lab activities, review systems of measurement, create and interpret maps, charts and graphs, conduct primary and secondary research, and quarterly article summaries.

Honors Biology

  • Grade level: 9th
  • Text: Biology; McDougal/Littell
  • 1 year/1.0 credit
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Honors Biology parallels the units offered in our general Biology course, but is more in-depth and comprehensive, moves at a faster pace, focuses on developing a strong knowledge of the scientific method of investigation, and involve more critical thinking on the student’s part.

This class includes individual and group research and project work.

The lab exercises are enhanced and designed to stimulate interest in the subject matter and to involve students in the learning process through hands-on activities. Academically motivated students who are interested in the medical or biological fields are encouraged to take this course. Strong reading ability and research skills are expected.

Physics

  • Grade level: 12th
  • Text: Physics; Holt
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Physics is the branch of science that deals with the properties, changes, and interactions of matter and energy. Throughout the course of the year students will investigate a variety of topics including motion, force, energy, light, and electricity. This physics course is designed to give students a broad introduction to the concepts of physics without a heavy emphasis on mathematics. Students will apply the scientific method to their thought processes as they engage in hands on activities designed to investigate the topics covered in this class. Students will become familiar with the tools used in the laboratory and be able to compose technical lab reports including computer generated data tables and graphs.

Social Sciences

Course Plan

  • 9th grade
    • World Geography
  • 10th grade
    • World History
  • 11th grade
    • American History
    • AP European History (every other year)
    • AP U.S. History (every other year)
  • 12th grade
    • Civics (1 semester)
    • Modern Civilizations (1 semester)
    • AP European History (every other year)
    • AP U.S. History (every other year)

Department Overview

God has given us the ability to govern ourselves and institute government. His principles and guidelines provide the foundation of a well ordered society. The Social Science department strives to ensure that our students become citizens who follow Jesus Christ as a role model in their interactions with society: individuals, government, and employment. To develop these skills, students will explore and examine the content areas of geography, history, economics, psychology, and government.

To meet current college track graduation requirements, students MUST complete 4 credits of Social Science.

American History

  • Grade level: 11th
  • Text: America Pathways to the Present; Prentice Hall
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

In this course, students will encounter the major eras in American history from migration and European exploration to the present. The course employs a Christian worldview as the standard to view the world and the study of history. Students will use document analysis, historical inquiry, and thematic organization to analyze the political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and technological aspects of American history.

AP European History

  • Grade level: 11th
  • Text: America Pathways to the Present; Prentice Hall
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

In this course, students will encounter the major eras in American history from migration and European exploration to the present. The course employs a Christian worldview as the standard to view the world and the study of history. Students will use document analysis, historical inquiry, and thematic organization to analyze the political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and technological aspects of American history.

AP U.S. History

  • Grade level: 11th
  • Text: America Pathways to the Present; Prentice Hall
  • 1 year/1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

In this course, students will encounter the major eras in American history from migration and European exploration to the present. The course employs a Christian worldview as the standard to view the world and the study of history. Students will use document analysis, historical inquiry, and thematic organization to analyze the political, economic, religious, social, intellectual, and technological aspects of American history.

Civics

  • Grade level: 12th
  • Text: American Government
  • 1 semester/0.5 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

An introduction to the nature and study of politics in American government at all levels, including an examination of the basic concepts of law, government and the state. Attention is also given to the various institutions and processes of government and politics through which law and policy are formulated, decided, implemented, and enforced. The course is designed to help students understand the limited but important place of government and politics within the overall panorama of creation. Students will also develop a critical framework, informed by a Biblical worldview, from which to analyze and evaluate various approaches to the contemporary political scene. Students will also acquire a sense of their on responsibilities as citizens and of how this relates to their other responsibilities towards family, church, employment, etc.

Modern Civilizations

  • Grade level: 12th
  • Text: American Government
  • 1 semester/0.5 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

An introduction to the nature and study of politics in American government at all levels, including an examination of the basic concepts of law, government and the state. Attention is also given to the various institutions and processes of government and politics through which law and policy are formulated, decided, implemented, and enforced. The course is designed to help students understand the limited but important place of government and politics within the overall panorama of creation. Students will also develop a critical framework, informed by a Biblical worldview, from which to analyze and evaluate various approaches to the contemporary political scene. Students will also acquire a sense of their on responsibilities as citizens and of how this relates to their other responsibilities towards family, church, employment, etc.

World Geography

  • Grade level: 9th
  • Text: Geography: The World and Its People; Glencoe-McGraw Hill
  • 1 year/ 1.0 credits
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

Geography is the study of God’s creations (solar system, earth, global regions, landforms, water forms, places, plants, and animals) and how God’s most previous creation, human beings, interact with them. Students will analyze the physical and human characteristics of places and regions within the world; and examine the physical processes, ecosystems, and human activities that shape the earth’s surface. In doing so, students will increase their understanding of the relationships between people, places, and environments in order to interpret the past and understand their future. World Geography is a yearlong course.

World History

  • Grade level: 10th
  • Text: World History Connections to Today; Prentice Hall
  • 1 year/1.0 credit
  • Approved by: NCAA
  • Core Class

This course provides a look at world history from the perspective of God’s dealings with mankind. Students will explore the people, events, and developments that form the major eras of history from the Middle Ages through the first global conflict. An emphasis will be put on the development and changes in major worldviews that shape human interactions and behaviors as compared and contrasted to a Biblical worldview. Special focus will be on linking the past to the present recognizing the contribution these historical eras have had on the world today. The process of historical inquiry, chronological organization, synthesis of information, and critical thinking will be utilized.

Electives

These courses provide students with a wide variety of academic interests that will help students pursue and engage in critical thinking outside their core courses.

Please be aware that elective availability is based on enrollment and registration, so not all electives are offered each year. Please note that many of the elective courses require an additional fee. Keep this in mind when choosing your electives.

Some courses may fit multiple categories so could be used to fulfill fine arts, physical education, or general credits as needed. Please speak with the Director of Guidance and Counseling to ensure you satisfy your credit requirements for graduation.

Electives: Fine Arts

Department Overview

Based on the core values and philosophy of FRCS, the mission of the Fine and Performing Arts Department is to produce students with a Christian mindset towards each discipline and who will “act justly, love mercy and walk humbly before God.” (Micah 4:6) It is to produce students who, as humans, understand their place in this world as revealed through God’s Word and through the various disciplines. Students are expected to honor the abilities which make humans unique in God’s creation through artistic creativity and in their capacities for speech, music and drama. Students will be encouraged to pursue wholeness in their area of interest with moral integrity and compassion for others and to develop abilities that will equip them to become discriminatory and innovative leaders.

Audio Engineering

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Textbook: Audio Engineering 101 (Beginner’s Guide) by Tim Dittmar; Waltham: Focal Press, 2012. ISBN # 0240819152. Kindle Edition Available.
  • 1 year/0.5 credit
  • Course Fee: $25

The systematic study of audio engineering for the purpose of developing practical skills for the operation and management of audio equipment in live performance and post-production settings. This class may not be offered every year.

Dance

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 Fine Arts or PE credit
  • Fee: $200 for the year
  • We need a minimum of eight students to offer this class

In this class students student’s will meet twice a week and learn two different styles of dance. We will be focusing on learning Jazz and Hip Hop/Breakdance.

During the Jazz class we will:

  • Complete a full Jazz warm up working flexibility and strength.
  • Learn Jazz technique including (but not limited to!):  Pas De Bourres traveling forward, backward and into pirouettes, Chaines, Battements, Leaps and a variety of turn combinations.
  • Learn a piece of choreography to a contemporary Christian song that utilizes the technique that we have worked on.

During Hip Hop/Breakdance we will:

  • Complete a Hip Hop warm up working endurance, stretching and strengthening.
  • Learn Hip Hop/Break technique including (but not limited to!):  Top Rocks, Brooklyn Rocks, Triangle Step, Kick Steps, Side Shuffles, Apache, and the Charleston),  as well as floor moves including Baby C’s, Six Steps, Single Leg Swipes, Double Leg Swipes, the Valdez, and Freezes.
  • Learn a piece of choreography to a Christian Hip Hop song that utilizes the technique that we have worked on.

Digital Photography

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 general OR Fine Arts elective credit
  • Fee: $20
  • Cap: 15

Digital Photography is designed to familiarize students with the basic functions of a digital camera. No special cameras required and all digital cameras welcome! This class focuses on how to use a camera properly, how to compose a photograph, using the different elements of art in photography and how to use Photoshop for basic editing. Creativity, innovation, and experimentation are emphasized as well as technical skills and classroom critique. When students are done with this class they will be transformed from photography novices, into someone who simply takes great pictures! Students are required to have the Photoshop App for their iPads.

Drama/Improv

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 credit
  • Fee: $10

Drama is fun and adding improvisation amplifies that fun ten times! This course gives students an opportunity to create while focusing on the basics of comedic improvisation. The students will develop scenes and characters while responding to a specific situation. Areas covered include active listening and understanding the stage and effective body positions, all so the actor looks good and feels confident while presenting.

Drawing & Painting 1

    • Grade level: 9-12th
    • 1 year/ 0.5 credits
  • Fee: $125 per semester and will require some personal purchases
  • Cap: 18 students

Students will gain an understanding at how to look at the world through the eyes of an artist. Breaking down everyday objects into basic shapes. Using contour lines along with values, space, and proportion to create 3-dimensional on a 2-dimensional surface. Along with this training, they will be introduced to the elements of art and the principles of design. As we progress further into the course, will begin painting basics, learn color theory and color schemes, and do several projects to introduce the artists to watercolor, acrylic, and gouache. If time allows, we will dive into some digital art as well.

Drawing & Painting 2

    • Grade level: 9th–12th
    • Credits: 1 year/0.5
    • Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting 1 or teacher approval
    • Fee: $125 per semester and will require some personal purchases
  • Cap: 18 students

All projects will be expected to be presented showing the highest professional crafting level possible as compared with industry standards. Students are encouraged to purchase these materials on an as-needed basis throughout the semester.

The basic principles, elements, and techniques of design will be applied through several projects emphasizing the student’s ability to master different media and skill levels. Visualization skills will be refined while students learn the practical steps of good design and craftsmanship.

Students will be able to present their portfolio for an overview at the first of the semester. We will preview all art and determine what projects each student needs to complete for a strong portfolio presentation. Students are required to draw 3-5 drawings per week in their sketch books along with 3 comps for each project. Each semester will require 4 finished projects.

Mixed Choir

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • 1 year/1 credit
  • Fee: $40 (covers local travel fees, music, and equipment maintenance)

Male and female singers (mixed) explore all genres of vocal music including jazz, pop, Broadway, traditional sacred, secular, a cappella, and more. They work to develop sight-singing of notation, interval-ear training, rhythm reading, and strong vocal performance techniques in a fun, energized, challenging, and supportive environment. Focus is placed on developing the full vocal capabilities of each singer to worship and glorify God wholeheartedly, in building relationships, and on building a top music ensemble. Students will perform in four FRCS concerts, including Grandparents Day and the Café Concert. Travel to a local senior living facility once or twice per year is included in outreach opportunities. Bob Jones HS Arts Festival at the end of October will be an optional, self-funded highlight!

Guitar

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 Fine Arts credit
  • Fee: $20

This class is designed to cover the basic styles (worship, acoustic, rock, classical, jazz, electric etc.) and technique on the guitar while learning basic scales, tunings, chords, notation and tablature in a group setting. Students receive individual and group instruction and are taught how guitar can be used in worship, solo, ensemble and band settings. This class may not meet every year.

Class requirements: The student is expected to provide their own acoustic guitar for use during class and practice during the week.

Sewing 101

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisites: none
  • 1 semester/0.25 elective credits
  • Fee: $5
  • Cap: none

This course teaches students a basic understanding of sewing notions, hand stitches, sewing machines, fabrics, and basic mending skills. Students will learn to sew on their own buttons, hem their own pants, and be able to make something for themselves. During this class students will complete simple projects in order to develop basic skills that can be adapted to suit their own needs for sewing.

Worship Band

Tuesday rehearsals from 7-9pm, with volunteer Wednesday junior/senior high chapel leading

  • Grade level: 9-12th
  • Prerequisite: Ability to play an instrument and understanding of home practice responsibilities
  • 1 year/1 credit is awarded for Tuesday night rehearsals, Grandparents Day, Christmas, Café Concert, and Spring Concert performance participation
  • Fee: $40 to cover cost of music, monthly website and application subscriptions, and equipment purchase and maintenance

Students enrolling should have the ability to play guitar, keyboard, or percussion. Vocalists must understand the lead singer lyric memory expectations and background harmony opportunities related to praise-style music. Private or online study is highly encouraged but not required. They explore music through group instruction, practice and performance in a band setting. Student musicians learn how to prepare assigned, 2-4 song sets through Planning Center Services online and through their mobile devices with the MultiTracks rehearsal mix application for a minimum of 1-2 hours per week of home practice in order to rehearse weekly with their band. Students accompany vocalists, explore various praise styles, and learn the application of ear-training and theory in areas such as chord progressions, transposition, and keys as it relates to instrumental music. Emphasis is placed on learning to play with sensitivity to the lyrics and variation of the dynamics, tempo and vocal/instrumental arrangements within the music. The spiritual component of both fresh and familiar Gospel presentations receives primary emphasis. Various church worship leaders often work alongside and encourage this close-knit community of young worship musicians. As image-bearers of God, we joyfully celebrate and testify of our Lord’s faithfulness to our community through music, intrinsic cuing techniques, and public prayer. There is an interview required; please talk with Mrs. Potwin for more details. Tuesday class and concert attendance credit only is awarded. Leading Wednesday chapel worship is simply a response to God’s call to worship where no extra course credit is awarded. Please prayerfully consider God’s good, perfect, and often unique will for service . . . specifically for the praise & worship leading of our student congregation.

Electives: General

Aeronautics

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $125
  • Cap: 13 students

Aeronautics is a project-based class designed to give students a hands-on approach to learning basic principles and practices of engineering, flight, and aircraft design. This class will challenge students in designing and building working R/C aircraft that meet pre-determined criteria, and is specifically designed for students who are interested in pursuing careers in the field of engineering. Interest in mathematics and good problem-solving skills are highly encouraged for success in the class.

Students who have taken this class in previous years will now have an opportunity to challenge themselves with building three dimensional aircraft. In the process, students will further their understanding of fuselage and wing design, as well as learning and applying more advanced aeronautical principles. Students who are interested in this secondary portion of the class need to be highly motivated in order to be successful.

Advanced Multimedia

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisites: Introduction to Video Production or like experience
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credits
  • Fee: $75
  • Cap: 14 students

First semester students will learn more advanced video production skills through project based assignments which may include public service announcements, commercials, shorts and/or music videos. Skills emphasized in these projects include special effects and green screen shooting, graphic composition, exporting media for web or social media and DVD authoring.

Second semester students will create digital projects including a digital textbook created in iBooks Author about a topic of their choosing. The textbooks will include student made videos and other digital projects. At the end of the semester students will design a digital portfolio/resume of all of their best work as well as a DVD containing all of their assignments.

Biblical Economics

  • Grade Level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisites: none
  • 1 year/0.5 credits
  • Fee: $30
  • Cap: None

Recent articles confirm that the number of high school students with credit cards has tripled in the past two years. This growth in teen credit card debt shows a lifestyle of instant gratification and the inability (or unwillingness) to live within one’s means. In fact, recent reports suggest that teens are one of the top targets of credit companies.

Crown Financial Ministry has produced a practical and succinct study on the biblical perspective money God offers all of us. Our course centers around God’s Word and the revised edition of Discovering God’s Way of Handling Money Teen Study. The class has been designed to practically help teens create habits to set them on a lifelong journey of handling money responsibly. It includes a unit on check writing.

This class is taught by Director of Advancement Dave Sherman. Dave has a teaching degree from the University of Redlands and has served FRCS in several roles over the last 17 years.

C.S. Lewis

  • Grade level: 10th-12th (9th with instructor permission)
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $25 for book and other expenses

Aside from the biography of C.S. Lewis included in the course fee, students will also need to procure the various books that we’ll be reading during the course of the year. They can raid their family’s bookshelves, local libraries, or purchase them if need be. Any edition of the following titles will do: The Chronicles of Narnia (all 7 books) and Mere Christianity. If time allows, we may read other books as well.

Culinary Arts

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • Credits: 1 year/0.5 elective credits
  • Fee: $250
  • Cap: TBD

This course will give students a basic understanding where the food they eat comes from and how it’s made. Our goal for this class is to have everyone be able cook basic recipes and meals, including determining an acceptable replacement for missing ingredients. Students will also complete a book with their own recipes to take with them for the future. Not everyone learns at the same pace, but I expect everyone to be respectful of each other and allow each other the grace to complete their individual projects. I also expect everyone attending the class to complete all projects as assigned. I will make time as necessary to help one on one with the completion of projects. This is a pass/fail class. Please complete required coursework to the best of your ability.

Cultural and Social Investigations

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $20 [plus a $25 expense/donation to an international charity (not included in fee) to be paid by student during first semester]

This course explores a number of social issues facing our local communities, nation, and world. Course topics may include issues such as poverty, immigration, media and technology, human trafficking, environment and agriculture, multiculturalism, abortion, and the relationship between church and state. Through films, guest speaker visits, field trips, and readings, students are presented with a variety of different voices and perspectives. Emphasis is placed not only on helping students to see the complexity of the issues, but on giving them the opportunity to think through how they might faithfully view and respond to them as followers of Christ.

Forensic Science

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Text: Crime Scene Investigations (The Center for Applied Research in Education)
  • Approved by NCAA
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $75 for consumable supplies

This course is an introduction to the field of forensic science. It incorporates several branches of science including physics, chemistry, archeology, anthropology, geography, biology, psychology, criminology, and sociology. The course is designed to introduce the scientific strategies of crime scene investigation where students take on the role of investigators by collecting and interpreting evidence and data. Excellent attendance is essential as this is a lab-based course. A field trip to a cadaver lab is offered when available. (This class is offered on a rotating basis and may not be available every year.)

Horticulture

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $100
  • Cap: 20

This class will focus on Urban Vegetable Growing for Colorado climate –  learn the principles and practices of growing food locally.  This elective will include horticulture principles, culture of local food production in Metro Denver and Colorado, the business of small farms and urban gardens.

Course Objectives – upon completion of this one year two semester course: Be able to identify seeds, plants, and pests for major vegetable crops and herbs in Colorado. Learn sustainable practices in agriculture and gardening. Understand the history of agriculture in USA and impact on culture and life. See what God says about the land and our relationship to it and with it – Scripture, Culture and Agriculture. Successfully grow vegetables and herbs in our campus greenhouse and grow boxes. Learn principles and practices of growing in all four seasons in Colorado. Optional work at Ross family farm to understand care of small animals. This is an experiential based growing adventure that will provide life skills.

Intro to Computer Game Design

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 semester/0.25 elective credits
  • Cap: none
  • Fee: $20

This course looks at the basics of computer game design including event-driven programming, sprites, timers, random paths, and debugging. Game maker and another game IDE will be used to develop simple games. Students will develop a working knowledge of programming. No programming experience is necessary.

Living Biblical Hebrew

  • Grade level: 11th, 12th (10th with instructor permission)
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $30

This language course is designed to introduce students to Biblical Hebrew. It covers the basic linguistic features of Hebrew such as grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and verbal systems. This is a “living” course in two aspects. First, the course is taught using a “living language” approach. Students will speak Hebrew in class, play games in Hebrew, and listen as the text is read and the psalms are sung. Second, this course is “living” in the sense that the Old Testament truly comes alive when read in Hebrew. Students will learn to read the actual Hebrew text, but they will also learn about culture, customs, and geography in the ancient world. The goal is that students become experts at Hebrew language, familiar with cultural and geographical aspects of the ancient world, and appreciative of the richness that is so present in the Bible.

Missions

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • Text: Missio Dei book and journal
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $40

“Imagine how different life would be if you recognized that God is calling you to something grand, something larger than yourself – a journey in an epic story that has been going on from the beginning of time until this very day.” Join us for an in-depth look at God’s Epic story from the beginning to now and how you fit into the picture. Our journey includes what Scripture tells us about this epic story, how various cultures come into play, and how we have seen this epic story played out in history, and concludes with practices to help you take full advantage of God’s part for you. Our goal is to get this course approved for CCP credit. The course will include reading, written assignments and 2 projects. Not for the faint of heart!

Peer Leadership

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Texts: Peer Ministry Training: Basic Curriculum by Barbara B. Varenhorst, Ph.D; Peer Mediation: Conflict Resolution in Schools by Fred Schrumpf, Donna K. Crawford, and Richard J. Bodine.
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $25 for book and other expenses

This course is designed to help students develop leadership skills to reach out to each other, encourage one another, and better other’s well-being. Students focus on two areas of how to serve their fellow peers. The first section of this class focuses on human relations and peer counseling. This section is designed to provide an understanding of the elements of communication: listening skills, questioning skills, feedback and paraphrasing skill, non-verbal communication skills, non-judgmental and response skills. It also covers confidentiality, trust, problem solving, decision making and goal setting. Becoming a peer counselor is NOT designed to transform the student into a professional counselor. It is designed to make them a good listener; teach them limits as a peer helper and to inform them when it becomes their responsibility to see professional help for individuals that they may be helping.

The second section of this class focuses on peer mediation and resolving conflict biblically. Students learn how to deal with conflict and the process of how a peer mediator facilitates a positive process of communication and problem solving that leads to resolution. Peer Mediation is a “chance to sit face to face and talk, uninterrupted, so each side of the dispute is heard.” After the problem is defined, solutions are created and then evaluated. When an agreement is reached, it is written and signed. The conflicts that peer mediators can resolve are those arising between students, students and teachers, students and rules, and students and grades.

Psychology

  • Grade level: 10th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $0
  • Cap: 25 students

This course is designed to instruct students in the basic concepts and tenets of historical and contemporary psychology. Special emphasis is given to understanding and implementing the practical aspects of psychological science. Man’s complex nature is examined in light of what Scripture affirms about mankind as a special creation. The course examines contemporary careers in the field of psychology with a special look at ministry opportunities.

Video Production/Animation

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $75
  • Cap: 14 students

Video Production is a course designed to teach the fundamentals of video production in a fun, hands-on environment.  Students will learn the production process, including pre-production (scriptwriting and storyboarding), production (shooting, lighting and sound), and post-production (editing, special effects, graphics and audio).  Students watch and analyze film clips for their lighting, composition, camera position, movement, lens, depth of field, use of screen space, placement of performers, and editing techniques.

Students will use Mac based software to produce school-related, Christ-centered short films and commercials. Second semester students will study animation, including claymation, stop motion and cartoon.

Web Design

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: None
  • Credits:1 semester/0.25 elective credits
  • Fee: $15
  • Cap: None

This course will teach students how to design a web site from scratch including a working knowledge of HTML and some basic JAVA script. Students will develop complete web sites with multiple pages as a final project. Students will learn about web hosting and how to use a web content management system (CMS) to develop attractive web sites with ease (we will be using WordPress). No programming or web development experience is necessary.

World Religions

  • Grade level: 10th-12th (9th with instructor permission)
  • Prerequisite: none
  • Texts: So What’s the Difference? A Look at Twenty Worldviews, Faiths and Religions and How They Compare to Christianity, Fritz Ridenour, 2001 Regal Press, 3rd Edition; Jesus Among Other Gods: The Absolute Claims of the Christian Message, Ravi Zacharias, Thomas Nelson Publishing, 2002
  • 1 year/0.5 elective credit
  • Fee: $15 + textbook purchases

This course provides the student with a general overview of the major religions that exist in the world today as well as an understanding of their origins, development, and adaptation to present day social and political situations. World Religions is the study of Biblical Christianity and how it compares to major world religions and belief systems. Students study and analyze other belief systems and compare them to Biblical standards of truth. World Religions also delves into the challenges to Biblical Christianity in a culture that increasingly promotes diversity, pluralism and a “new tolerance.” In addition to the study of major religions, this course provides insight into various alternate spiritualities of our day and how they influence contemporary religious thought.

Yearbook

    • Grade level: 9th-12th
    • Prerequisite: None
  • Credits: 1 year/0.5 General Elective

Students in the Yearbook class are the leaders and decision-makers of the yearbook for Front Range Christian School. Students will complete a myriad of tasks to create a quality yearbook that reflects the pictorial history of the activities for the present school year. Students will function as staff members and learn various aspects of the yearbook publication process such as layout and design, writing “beyond the obvious,” photography, budget and finance, and promotion and publicity. During both semesters, students are responsible for producing complete layouts in order to meet publication deadlines. Yearbook is designed to be both a challenging and highly-rewarding course, training students in leadership, teamwork, creativity, and critical thinking.

Guidelines for Acceptance: Yearbook class is a demanding course that not only prepares students to be excellent leaders and team members, but also looks outstanding on college applications. Because of this, students must apply to be considered for staff. Applications (if not already filled out) must be picked up and submitted at the Yearbook table on Registration Day.

Electives: Physical Education

Cross Fitness

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 PE credit
  • Course cost: $100 for the year

This fitness class is a perfect blend of cardio conditioning and straight training. Designed and guaranteed to excel you to the next level. Great for athletes looking to improve the speed and agility in the game, or the average teen who wants to be healthy and fit. CrossFitness mixes drills from cardio kickboxing using punching bags and air attack combos, as well as Crossfit exercises such as kettelbells and medicine balls. This class helps students lose weight, tone their bodies, track their progress through fit tests and improve coordination, and teaches them healthy eating choices.

Kick Boxing

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 PE credit
  • Course cost: $199
  • This fitness class is a popular training program that is a fun, action-packed workout that combines martial arts, boxing and dance moves. You get a challenging cardiovascular and full body workout as you kick, punch, block and move in each Cardio Kickboxing class.

The techniques used during the 100 minute classes, using conventional heavy bags and training pads, are based on authentic kickboxing techniques which provide both resistance training and cardiovascular benefits to its participants.

Gear required:

  • Running Shoes
  • Workout apparel ex: shorts and t-shirt

Lifetime Sports

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 PE credit
  • Fee: $65 for activity fee and transportation

Life Time Sports class is designed to introduce several different activities that students can use to maintain a physically active life style. This class is unique in that students will be introduced to many different individual and dual sports as well as team sports they may have never played before.

Martial Arts: Unified Tae Kwon Do

    • Grades level: 7th-12th
    • Credit: 1 year/1 credit
    • Fee: $300 (includes uniform)
  • Cap: 25

Unified Tae Kwon Do is dedicated to promoting social inclusion through shared martial arts training and competition experiences. Unified Tae Kwon Do joins students with or without intellectual disabilities in the same class; training together and playing together for a quick path to friendship and understanding. Young people with disabilities do not often have the opportunity to play on their school sports teams, so more and more U.S. states are adopting the Unified Sports approach that Special Olympics pioneered.

This course is designed to teach focus, concentration, muscle development, balance, and gross motor coordination within the context of Tae Kwon Do. Training also targets behavior development, awareness of others, self-confidence, and character development. Tae Kwon Do is the most effective method of weaponless self-defense, an intricate art form, and Olympic sport, and a means of maintaining physical fitness.

Since Tae Kwon Do should not be measured on physical ability alone, tests are given by qualified instructors and evaluate one’s overall performance including concentration and attitude as well as physical techniques, forms, and breaking. Martial Art students are expected to show more emphasis on respect and mind control rather than show-off abilities.

Earning a black belt is not an easy task. When a student sets goals and adheres to the training with patience, it can be achieved during their school experience here at FRCS. In the process, the student will learn to become successful in both Martial Arts and everyday life.

Performance Training

    • Grades level: 9th-12th
    • Prerequisite: none
    • Credit: 1 year/0.5 credit
  • Cap: 35

Performance Training is a class designed to offer instruction and practice in proper techniques of developing muscular strength, endurance, and flexibility. An emphasis is put on the science behind properly training and fueling your body. Instructors introduce basic elements of kinesiology, anatomy, physiology, and nutrition to improve students’ understanding and application of how to properly strengthen and condition their bodies. They key outcomes through the course of the year will be improved explosiveness, speed, agility, strength, and injury prevention. In order to accomplish these goals, students do workouts ranging from Olympic-style lifting to stretching and everything in between.

Pickle Ball

    • Grades level: 9th-12th
    • Prerequisite: none
    • Credit: Semester/0.25 credit
    • Fee: $90
  • Cap: 16

Pickle Ball is a class designed to offer instruction and practice in proper techniques of playing the game pickle ball. Students will learn the rules of the game, how to score the game, and different styles of serving and returning the ball. Students will get exercise while learning a game that can be played throughout the year in Colorado. This class will increase student’s flexibility and hand/eye coordination skills. The class will culminate with a mini-tournament.

Weights

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: none
  • 1 year/0.5 PE credit
  • Fee: $100 (to help update and maintain equipment)
  • Cap: 35 students

Weights is a class designed to offer instruction and practice in proper techniques of developing muscular strength, endurance, and flexibility. An emphasis is put on the science behind properly training and fueling your body. Instructors introduce basic elements of kinesiology, anatomy, physiology, and nutrition to improve students’ understanding and application of how to properly strengthen and condition their bodies. The key outcomes through the course of the year will be improved explosiveness, speed, agility, strength, and injury prevention. In order to accomplish these goals, students do workouts ranging from Olympic-style lifting to yoga and everything in between.

Women’s Health & Fitness

    • Grades level: 9th-12th
    • Prerequisite: none
    • Credit: 1 year/0.5 credit
    • Fee: $85 per semester
  • Cap: 20 women

Let’s get active! In this class, we will have fun exploring several different types of fitness formats from Dance Fitness to Bootcamp. In our workouts, we will be strengthening our hearts in faith and understanding, as well as building community and friendships. We will learn how nutrition and fitness are intended for our well-being – in God’s design of our bodies. We will also explore our image in God’s eyes and our identity in Christ, learning from each other at times in open discussion. Part of our curriculum will include Girls with Swords by Lisa Bevere. Book is included in the class fee. 1 Timothy 4:8

Electives: Required

College & Career Planning

  • Grade level: 11th
  • Text: ACT Victory, Cambridge
  • 1 year/0.5 credits
  • Required Elective
  • Fee: $45 ACT Prep Book and Materials

This course is designed to prepare students to take the ACT college entrance exam with a small introduction into the SAT as well. In addition, students are provided the necessary information to make an informed decision about college and develop the tools necessary to complete college applications, scholarships applications, and financial aid requests.

Speech

  • Grade level: 9th-12th
  • Prerequisite: None
  • 1 year/1 credit
  • Required Class: Speech is required

This course is designed to build confidence and provide basic skills in public speaking with an emphasis placed on clear organization and competent presentation. Value is placed on group activities involving efficient listening skills and dialogue in the sharing of ideas. Debate is also introduced as a form of public speaking emphasizing the organization of arguments and the use of proof in which to support the arguments. A stimulating, interactive, open, and friendly classroom environment will be maintained in order to promote critical thinking, intellectual growth and communicative competence. As human beings created in the image of God, we have a responsibility to communicate in a way that influences our world and honors him. It is with that focus, we will strive to image our Lord well.

Club “Courses”

FRCS Clubs differ from the classes in that they primarily meet outside of school instruction time and a student does not receive academic credit for the course.

  • Justice Club (IJM)
  • National Honor Society
  • Praise & Worship Team
  • Spiritual Lift Committee
  • Student Council