Each fall, Front Range Christian School is pleased to produce a play with cast members from the high school. It’s a fun way for students to be involved in extra-curricular activities while developing their creativity and confidence.

2017 - The Curious Savage

Mrs. Savage has been left ten million dollars by her husband and wants to make the best use of it, in spite of her grown-up stepchildren’s efforts to get their hands on it. Knowing that the widow’s wealth is now in negotiable securities, and seeing they cannot get hold of the fortune, the stepchildren commit her to a sanatorium hoping to “bring her to her senses.” In the sanatorium Mrs. Savage meets various social misfits, men and women who just cannot adjust themselves to life, people who need the help Mrs. Savage can provide. In getting to know them, she realizes that she will find happiness with them and plans to spend the rest of her life as one of them. But when the doctor tells her there is no reason why she should remain, she hesitates to go out into a hard world where people seem ready to do anything for money. The self-seeking stepchildren are driven to distraction by their vain efforts to browbeat Mrs. Savage, but she preserves her equanimity and leads them on a merry chase. At last her friends conspire to get rid of her stepchildren, and through their simple belief in the justice of her cause, they enable Mrs. Savage to carry out her plans to establish a fund to help others realize their hopes and dreams. The dominant mood is high comedy, and the audience is left with a feeling that the neglected virtues of kindness and affection have not been entirely lost in a world that seems at times motivated only by greed and dishonesty.

An entertaining and fanciful comedy appropriate for all ages.

November 16-18, 2017, at 7pm

  • $9 general admission
  • $7 for seniors (55+) and students
  • FRCS students are free

Purchase Tickets Online

Fall Play Archive

2016 - Kind Lady

A suspense-filled thriller by Edward Chodorov based on a story by Hugh Walpole.

Mary Herries is a dignified, aristocratic women who lives quietly in her London home. She has a passion for art and fine furniture, and even though she is getting on in years, she enjoys being around these priceless articles. One day she meets a strange, young painter named Elcott, who uses his painting skill to enter into her life. Little does she suspect that this conman’s only interest is to covet everything she has.

This play was adapted for the screen in both 1935 and 1951.

See photos from the play

2015 - The Importance of Being Earnest

“A Trivial Comedy for Serious People” is a classic, farcical comedy by Oscar Wilde. During the Victorian time period, keeping up with appearances was of utmost importance for those in high society. The social rules were superficial, well defined, and to be followed if one was to be a credit to their class and upbringing. Oscar Wilde was from Ireland, which positioned him on the outside of respectable London society and gave him the perfect vantage point for poking fun at it. Through his writing, he mocked the way wealthy, polite society trivialized serious themes like marriage and honesty while obsessing over trivial aspects of life, such as cucumber sandwiches. The earnest/Ernest play-on-words elevates this difference. This trait of Wilde’s writing provided material for thoughtful discussions during rehearsals, as the cast & crew reflected on superficiality and materialism in our own culture, while evaluating what really honors God. On February 14, 1895, The Importance of Being Earnest made its debut and Wilde moved up in London society. They loved his humor even when it came at their own expense, which the following lines exemplify.

  • Algernon: “The amount of women in London who flirt with their own husbands is perfectly scandalous. It is simply washing one’s clean linen in public.”
  • Gwendolyn: “In matters of grave importance, style, not sincerity, is the vital thing.”
  • Jack: “It is a terrible thing for a man to find out suddenly that all his life he has been speaking nothing but the truth. Can you forgive me?”

Photos from the play:

 

Photos from the FRCS production of "The Importance of Being Earnest" -- if you have photos to add to this album, please email them to comm@frcs.org

Posted by Front Range Christian School on Monday, October 26, 2015

 

2014 - The Miracle Worker

The Miracle Worker is a three-act play written by William Gibson and based on the autobiography of Helen Keller, The Story of My Life. The Miracle Worker tells the true story of Helen Keller, an Alabama girl struck blind and deaf as a baby after a high fever. Although her parents try to help her, Helen’s inability to communicate cause her to be undisciplined, violent and wild. In desperation, they hire Annie Sullivan, a partially blind, stubborn woman and assign her the task of teaching Helen. Annie and Helen enter into a tumultuous relationship. Annie is confident that when Helen learns to communicate, her mind will be free to understand the world around her. After separating Helen from her over-protective parents Annie begins the difficult process of teaching the girl. Even though Helen can spell back words onto Annie’s palm, her understanding of the words escape her. The intense time with Helen didn’t seem fruitful, and when Helen and Annie return to the family, Helen falls back into her unruly behavior. The Kellers are upset with the lack of progress. Annie doesn’t give up. When Helen spills a water pitcher on Annie, Annie takes her outside to refill it. Through this rough encounter, Annie spells “water” onto Helen’s hand. Suddenly, the miracle happens - Annie breaks through the silence and darkness of Helen’s world - Helen understands.

Quality Street - Fall 2013

The play Quality Street by J.M. Barrie (the author of Peter Pan) is set in England during the early 19th century. Sisters, Phoebe and Susan Throssel, have made friends with Dr. Valentine Brown. Phoebe would like it to be more than friends and believes Dr. Brown feels the same, until he announces he has enlisted to fight against Napoleon and will be leaving Quality Street. Phoebe is heartbroken. She and Susan open a school in their home and for 10 years they make do with this drab existence. When the war is over, Valentine comes back but barely recognizes Phoebe as she has worn herself out teaching. He leaves Phoebe devastated and feeling somewhat insulted. Frustrated, Phoebe changes her dress and her hairstyle to show Susan she still has some youth left. Valentine returns to take Phoebe to a homecoming ball and fails to recognize her. Phoebe takes the opportunity to be a tease and create a new identity. It is this deception that increases the humor and makes Quality Street one of Barrie's most noted period pieces.

See photos from rehearsals and the play

You Can’t Take It With You - Fall 2012

You Can’t Take It With You is a comedic play in three acts by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The Sycamores are a family of lively, free spirits. Their daughter is engaged to a man from a wealthy, straight-laced family, the Kirbys. Mayhem ensues when the Kirbys show up for dinner on the wrong night. This is a hilarious story of romance, wealth and poverty, and true happiness.

 

 

​The Matchmaker - Fall 2011

Matchmaker is set in the 19th century and tells the story of a woman by the name of Dolly Levi who seeks to arrange marriages for those around her and suddenly finds herself in the middle of it all. The stubborn, gruff Mr. Vandergelder, is determined to find a wife, though she turns out to be quite different from who he originally intended to marry. Matchmaker is a delightful comedy, following the lives of the entertaining characters as their paths intertwine. For those who are familiar with “Hello Dolly,” this play is the story without the music. We hope you will enjoy it!

Photo Gallery from the Matchmaker